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2/5: Sean Marciniak, Poet

2/12: Tom Smith, Photographer

2/19: Adam Kane, Essayist


2/26: Brett Jones, Fiction Writer

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February 2014

Welcome to the very first newsletter of The Rain, Party, & Disaster Society. February’s issue is taking RPD to the next level with lots of small changes that add up to a more powerful publication. This month, for the very first time ever, we are featuring one piece per contributor. We received so many stunning submissions for this issue that we had to make sure we made room for all the unique voices that so clearly spoke to the manifesto of our magazine. You’ll experience a sub-genre of micro-fiction that Kay Kerimian has affectionately dubbed “head-splatter fiction,” poetry that covers everything from healthcare to drunken debauchery, and a nonfiction piece that is more religious experience than essay. We hope you enjoy our third issue as much as we enjoyed assembling it.

If you’re interested in submitting for our March issue, submissions are now open and will close on Saturday, February 15th. Should a piece strike a chord with you, we’d love to hear from you about it. E-mail us your comments and concerns; you may find your writing featured in a future edition of the magazine. Make sure to review our guidelines before submitting.

 
COMING IN FEBRUARY: #RPDPC
WE'RE HOLDING OUR FIRST 140 CHARACTER TWITTER CONTEST. WINNERS TO BE PUBLISHED. FOLLOW @RPDSOCIETY ON FOR DETAILS.

WHAT WE'RE READING AT OUR DESKS

Jordan Rizzieri: I'm taking my time with a play entitled Alice and Peter by John Logan (screenwriter for Gladiator, The Aviator, Hugo and Skyfall), which focuses on the 1932 meeting of Alice Liddell Hargreaves (Alice in Wonderland) and Peter Llewellyn Davies (Peter Pan) at the opening of a Lewis Carroll exhibition. I'm also about halfway through the complete Joker arc from the exquisite DC "Death of the Family" storyline and have the Batman arc waiting in the wings.

Jen Lombardo:  I’m reading The Shining Girls, a novel by Lauren Beukes about a serial killer who finds a house that opens onto other times. In this way, he's able to jump around in time and kill the women that the House has chosen for him. Because the murders span several decades, no one suspects him of being the killer of all the girls - but one of his chosen victims survives her attack and is determined to track him down. The author's dialogue lacks a sense of realism, but her descriptions and the way she gets inside the mind of a killer are exceptional. It's a dark and disturbing read, but very well done.

Kay Kerimian: I'm simultaneously juggling several books at the moment. When I have a day off, it’s Telegraph Avenue by Michael Chabon. When I'm in the mood for something brief, it’s The Best American Travel Writing of 2013, carefully edited and curated by Elizabeth Gilbert. I'm also dabbling between Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers: The Story of Success, the play Major Barbara by George Bernard Shaw, and The Little Black Book of Kama Sutra, which I received as a Christmas present. *phew*

Bee Walsh: I'm rereading Sarah Marcus' Girls to the Front. Marcus set out to write the definitive history of the "Riot Grrrl" and "Revolution Grrrl Style Now" movements. She follows the young radical feminist uprising of the early 1990's, specifically the actions of incendiary punk bands such as Bikini Kill and Bratmobile. More than a catalog of female-fronted punk, Marcus got into the blood of the matter, the yearning of young women coming out of their mothers' struggle to be "taken as people" and to have autonomy over their own bodies.

WRITING PROMPTS

1. Put to paper one excruciatingly painful truth about yourself as an "I" statement, i.e. "I am full of faith but often unfaithful." Build a three-stanza poem around it.

2. Write a conversation between two characters that makes it clear which character is speaking at which time, without using dialogue tags.

3.  Compose a poem or flash fiction in which the first letter of each line spells out something (ie: lewis carroll's "life is but a dream" poem: http://allpoetry.com/poem/8439319-Life-is-but-a-Dream-by-Lewis-Carroll), or in which the first word of each line spells out something (ie: recent viral student essay/prank: 
http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/student-pulls-of-rickroll-prank-in-physics-essay-143253131.html)

4. Begin your short story or poem from the end: write your last line first and then slowly build the work backwards to the opening.

 
JANUARY ARCHIVE

Be sure to visit the archive of January's posts, neatly arranged in a digital "glossy" version under the Archives tab at the top of the site.

 
Until next time, 
Jordan, Jen, Kay, & Bee
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